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will they tax me for bringing stuff into mexico?


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#1 synthea

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Posted 22 January 2011 - 12:07 AM

im taking a table with chairs into the otay border crossing from the U.S....its in a box "new"....will they charge me any taxes?

#2 bajashrink

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Posted 22 January 2011 - 02:36 AM

I believe the amount of merchandise you can bring into the country duty-free is 300 dollars-worth. Have a receipt of purchase with you.

#3 zunigan

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 03:16 PM

Can you cross more than once with your stuff. Things have changed since I came in 2007, at that time I just filled my truck up and drove across. No one stopped me or even looked at what I was bringing in. I was thinking of just getting a moving company like I did to move the stuff to Zacatecas to move it all across and place in house when I finally move.





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#4 Mary Ellen

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 06:00 PM

QUOTE (zunigan @ Jan 24 2011, 03:16 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Can you cross more than once with your stuff. Things have changed since I came in 2007, at that time I just filled my truck up and drove across. No one stopped me or even looked at what I was bringing in. I was thinking of just getting a moving company like I did to move the stuff to Zacatecas to move it all across and place in house when I finally move.


It's much less hassle just to buy that stuff in Mexico. By the time you get it across the border it could cost you double what you paid so why bother with it.

#5 zunigan

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 03:14 PM

Your probably right. I brought alot of stuff with me over the course of a few weeks, but alot we just got there. Thanks





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#6 synthea

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 09:21 PM

so I found out that day that yes... Zunigan your right...they didnt even stop me or look at what I was bringing in...
some stuff I have found its cheaper to buy in the states, and some is cheaper to buy in Mexico...either way...im glad that I dont get taxed for the stuff im brining in thats less than $300... thanks all! smile.gif

#7 andy

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Posted 10 February 2011 - 08:29 PM

The official information from the Mexican Government on importing by land crossing is here: http://www.aduanas.g.../139_10179.html

Summary from the above site:

What Can I bring in Duty Free

* The items allowed in your personal luggage, according to the length of your trip.
* Up to 75 USD per person in permitted goods, or its equivalent in other currencies. Passengers traveling with family members (spouse and children) may combine their personal exemptions only when arriving together on the same vehicle. In order to claim this additional exemption, passengers must have the corresponding commercial invoices or receipts available. There is a total combined exemption amount that is not stated. It used to be $400 per vehicle.
* Beer, alcoholic beverages, manufactured tobacco and motor vehicle fuel (except for the fuel contained in the vehicle’s fuel tank) may not be included in this additional exemption.

* If the value of the goods surpasses $3000 dollars (per family member) after subtracting the US$75 exemption, or if any of the goods is subject to non-tariff regulations or restrictions, you must hire the services of a customs broker.
* Beer, alcoholic beverages, manufactured tobacco and motor vehicle fuel (except for the fuel contained in the vehicle’s fuel tank) may not be included in this additional exemption.
* If you bring a desktop computer, you may pay duties and taxes by filling out a payment form as long as the value of the computer and its peripherals and accessories do not exceed US$4,000. If the total value of the computer and its peripherals and accessories exceeds US$4,000 you must hire the services of a customs broker.
* The import tax rate is 16% on the amount of items you import, after exemptions

* If the value of the items that you are importing are less than you exemption amount, you can proceed via the 'nothing to declare lanes'
* If the value of the items that you are importing is more than your exemption amount, you must proceed to the declaration area. A customs officer will get the value of your items (have receipts if new, helpful to have documented estimates for used items) and subtract your exemption amount. You then pay 16% import tax on the balance. You pay at the bank at customs. You can pay in pesos or dollars.

Items that can be 'in your luggage' that are exempt from importation:

1. Goods for personal use, such as clothing, footwear and personal toiletries and beauty products, as long as they are appropriate for the duration of the trip, including wedding party items. Baby travel accesories, such as strollers and baby-walkers.

2. Two photographic cameras or video recorders, 12 rolls of film or videocassettes; photographic material; three portable cell phone or other wireless networks; global positioning equipment (GPS); a portable typewriter; an electronic calendar; a portable computer (laptop), notebook, omnibook or similar items; a copier or portable printer; a portable projector, and their accessories.

3. Two sports equipment, four rods, three speedboats with or without sails and their accessories, trophies or recognitions, provided that they can be transported normally and commonly by the passenger, one stair climber and bicycle

4. A portable radio for the recording or reproduction of sound or mixed tapes; or a digital sound reproducer or portable reproducer of compact discs and a portable reproducer of DVD’s, such as a pair of portable speakers, and their accessories.

5. Five laser disks, 10 DVD disks, 30 compact disks (CD) or magnetic tapes (audiocassettes), for the reproduction of sound, three software packages and five storage devices or memory cards for any electronic equipments.

6. Books, magazines and printed documents.

7. Five toys, —included those that are collectible— and a video game console and five videogames.

8. One device that permits measurement of blood pressure and one for glucose, as well as medications of personal use; in the case of psychotropics the medical prescription should be shown.

9. One set of binoculars and a telescope.

10. Overnight bags, trunks and suitcases necessary for the movement of goods.

11. Passengers over 18 years of age, may introduce a maximum of up to 20 packs of cigarettes, 25 cigars or 200 grams of tobacco and up to three liters of alcoholic beverages, and six liters of wine; in excess of the above, cannot be imported without complying with applicable regulations and restrictions.

12. Two musical instruments and its accessories.

13. A camping tent and camping equipment, as well as their accessories.

14. A set of tools including its case, it might have a hand drill, wire cutters, wrenches, dices, screwdrivers, current cables, among others.

15. Up to two dogs or cats, maybe introduced as well as their accesories, provided that the corresponding zoosanitary import certificate issued by (SAGARPA) is presented to the customs officials.

#8 GaryN

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Posted 11 April 2011 - 12:46 AM

I haven't been hit with a tax yet but the other day they flagged a car full of items and made them go into the declare lane to pay a tax. 16 percent is not bad at all. I went TV shopping and the TVs in Mexico are close to 50 percent higher for some models.

#9 Tjc-tahc

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Posted 12 April 2011 - 08:32 PM

QUOTE (GaryN @ Apr 10 2011, 05:46 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I haven't been hit with a tax yet but the other day they flagged a car full of items and made them go into the declare lane to pay a tax. 16 percent is not bad at all. I went TV shopping and the TVs in Mexico are close to 50 percent higher for some models.


Kind of like change you can believe in.... Let's see 32% income tax. 16%VAT.
Police that will rob or kill you if you make them made or are carrying enough money..
Impunity, for rape,robbery,murder,..

But on the other side of that coin at least we don't use our tax income to invade other country's and kill little children & civilians , and call it collateral damage.

When will we all say enough...?

TJC

WDIGW




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